The Beauties and the Beasts of Social Customer Service

Take a number and take a seat…when you hear your number called you can approach the desk.

If you remember this scenario, you might laugh at how comical the past customer experience was. If you aren’t familiar, you have been lucky to grow up in the digital age of user freedom and expression.

Companies now have multiple touch points to give users personalization and interaction in all digital landscapes, or, in other words – great customer experience. Live chat, location services, customer service call centers, social comment blogs, online shopping, and even self-guidance software are all examples.

While these techniques are all vital, social media has produced a new channel of interaction and experience. Users are taking their experiences to social media, bridging the gap of power between large corporations and the single consumer. Customers are posting pictures of their latte art, tagging their favorite clothing brands, or showing grief for long checkout lines.

With all due respect to the large umbrella of customer experience – it is the core one-on-one customer service that business owners and customer care managers should have in mind. What really crowns a corporation leader is how they respond with-in social media world; how are they making everyone feel like they are number one.

It Just Takes One Second!

A single post or tweet can alert the masses. Companies must act quickly to address consumers and maintain their image as the best of the best. Although a corporation may find itself under fire on social media for poor customer experience, their reactions might actually offer us a classic example of the Beauty and the Beast comparison. Will you be the prince and win back the heart of your consumer? Or will you be quick to scowl or turn your back to the issue at hand? Companies must strive to be transparent, immediate, and encouraging. Let’s take a look at some of the best and worst ways companies have reacted on social media in particular and how the user was effected.

Will you be the prince and win back the heart of your consumer? Or will you be quick to scowl or turn your back to the issue at hand? Companies must strive to be transparent, immediate, and encouraging. Let’s take a look at some of the best and worst ways companies have reacted on social media in particular and how the user was effected.

The Beauties

Domino’s Pizza:

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Kudos to Domino’s for responding quickly and professionally to a customer in the dark. Even though Domino’s might have had their doubts about such a rare complaint, they acted swiftly and directly. It showed their consumers in general that no claim might not be taken seriously. Without a doubt it even gave Domino’s the utmost positive publicity, with this one tweet being shared thousands of times.

JetBlue:

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Here is another amazing example of how a company used honesty and care to recover from a negative customer experience. They first took the chance to apologize and empathize with the customer for their specific experience, then followed up by really taking the customer’s hand.

Large corporations like Jetblue understand how public social media is. This extra mile creates brand loyalty in the eyes of their consumers. They are not only showing Ryan they care, they are showing all possible current and future customers they mean business when it comes to their customer service experience.

 

The Beasts

Pigalle Boston:

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Hold your temper, don’t add fuel to the fire. Remember that the public eye is scrutinous, and a snarky comeback is no means to showing the world you have any customer service at all. Turn the animosity into care by acknowledging the issue even if there might not be an agreement. Extend an honest apology and even offer a discount or coupon for a future visit to make up for their negative experience.

British Airways:

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Although British Airways offered a kind response, they made the mistake of timing. If a company doesn’t respond within the first two hours, they have lost their customer completely. Companies now have to enlist the manpower to show consumers they are there for them 24/7.

Even when the company responded, they showed their cards when publicizing limited times their ears were open to their customers. The highest user experience in the digital arena is key in winning over the hearts of your audience.

The clear winners in the customer service arena out beat their competition by charm, care, and authenticity. They not only were there to offer apologies, agreements, or their concerns, but they arrived just before the last rose petal fell.

Matthew Thomas
Matthew is the Lead Author & Editor of CXperience Blog. Matthew established the CXperience blog to create a source for news and discussion about some of the issues, challenges, news, and ideas relating to Customer Experience.
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